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Brass
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Seasonal

Quintet

Quintet Sheet Music

Following are arrangements for 5 brass instruments in varying combinations.

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This popular hymn, written in 1225 by Francis of Assisi, expresses his love for all of God's creation, and that all creatures should praise God. Here, this setting of the hymn is interwoven with the Shaker hymn, "Simple Gifts", made popular by Aaron Copland in the ballet, Appalachian Spring. First one tune, then the other, then overlapping both tunes. Hope you like it.
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This traditional, Palm Sunday processional hymn was very likely written about 820 A.D. by Bishop Theodolph of Orleans, France, while he was imprisoned at the monastery of Angers by Charlemagne's son, Louis I the Pious. He was a poet, as well as a pastor before becoming the bishop of Orleans. The composer of the tune, Melchior Teschner was a cantor in the German Lutheran Church of his town and subsequently became a Lutheran pastor of Oberpriestschen, near Fraustadt. The tune was composed in 1613 for another text at first. The melody was considered by J. S. Bach to be so good that he borrowed it for his use in his St. John Passion.
It is arranged for 2 Trumpets, French Horn, Trombone and Tuba.
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It has been widely speculated as to the person that wrote the words to both these carols with the same name. It is generally accepted that the author of the first two verses is unknown, while the third verse is attributed to James R. Murray. The tune "Cradle Song" is believed to have been written by William J. Kirkpatrick, while the tune "Mueller" is believed to have been written by James R Murray.

Both of these tunes are combined in this brass quintet arrangement.
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This traditional 8th century, anonymous, Irish hymn text expresses the ageless need of man to have a heavenly vision and to experience God's care and personal presence throughout this earthly pilgrimage. Some think it was inspired by Proverbs 29:18, "Where there is no vision, the people perish..."

The tune, "Slane", is a traditional Irish air first published in 1909 and was originally used with a secular text. It was later associated with this hymn text in the Irish Church Hymnal of 1919.

It is arranged for 2 Trumpets, French Horn, Trombone and Tuba.

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This hymn, written in 1875 by Fannie Crosby is based on the scripture in Hebrews 10:22. It is a prayer of supplication: "Let us draw near with a true heart..." to the cross of Christ.

This subdued hymn arrangement would be ideal for any church service, but especially meaningful during communion or any service where one contemplates all the Christ has done for us.

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This hymn was written by Charles W. Robinson, an Irish pastor in 1876, one year before his death at age 39. The words convey the everlasting love that the Lord has for us and the peace that He alone can give us no matter what we face.
This is scored for traditional Brass Quintet: 2 Bb Trumpets, 1 F Horn, 1 Trombone, 1 Tuba.
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Prelude and Fugue on the tune, "I Sing the Mighty Power of God". This hymn was written in 1715 by Isaac Watts, an English pastor and well-known hymn writer of over 500 hymns. It is scored here for a traditional brass quintet.
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This hymn, written during the "Dark Ages" by the monk, Bernard of Clairvaux in the 12th century, was set to music by John B. Dykes, a well known hymn tune writer of over 300 tunes.

This tune, called, "St. Agnes" is scored for traditional brass quintet.

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This hymn was written by Charles Wesley in 1746 and is based on the scripture Philippians 4:4, "Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say Rejoice".

The tune itself was written by John Darwall in 1770.


The piece could be done with standard brass quintet and organ, or 2 Trumpets, 2 Trombones, Tuba and organ.

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An Austrian priest named Joseph Mohr had often talked with the village schoolmaster and church organist, Franz Gruber, that the perfect Christmas hymn had never been written. One Christmas season in 1818, when Father Mohr received news that the church organ would not function, he decided he must write his own Christmas hymn in order to have music for the Christmas Eve Mass. Upon completing it, he gave it Franz Gruber who set it to music. It was first performed at that service to the accompaniment of Gruber's guitar.

Today, it is perhaps the best known and the most sung of all Christmas Carols.

This brass quintet arrangement is written with the option of a short or long version of the tune.

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A Presbyterian minister, Daniel Iverson, wrote the words and music to this hymn in 1926 for a citywide revival in Orlando Florida. It was first published in "Revival Songs" in 1929 but later was found to be in hymnals of other denominations.


As one of my favorite choruses that I remember singing as a boy in the The Salvation Army, I have arranged it for a traditional Brass Quintet.

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Evangelists Seth and Bessie Sykes resigned from their work in 1929 and traveled to mission churches throughout Britain and the UK singing and preaching the gospel. This is one of the songs that the two of them wrote. Here it is written for traditional brass quintet with an intro, 1 verse and several choruses.
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